The greek god poseidon and his role in ancient myths

Interesting Facts About the Greek God Poseidon He lived in a palace under the sea that was made from jewels and coral.

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Poseidon drew the ocean and took control of the Sea Zeus drew the sky and Hades the Underworld. He had them build huge walls around the city and promised to reward them well, a promise he then refused to fulfill.

He was usually seen holding his trident.

poseidon myths

A Medusa type with a horse's head with snaky hair, holding a dove and a dolphin, probably representing her power over air and water. As the human population continues to grow, the amount of land available for people to live on will become ever smaller. Like Dionysuswho inflamed the maenadsPoseidon also caused certain forms of mental disturbance.

hades greek mythology

Advertise Here In the legendary competition with Athena to win the patronage of AthensPoseidon offered to the city the gifts of a saltwater spring and a horse. Burn incense of frankincense, myrrh, or mint at your altar.

Perhaps the most celebrated representation of Poseidon is the 2 metre-high bronze statue c.

Poseidon symbol

Quick to anger, he directed his fury at anyone who acted against him or failed to show proper respect. Listen to a recorded reading of this page: Your browser does not support the audio element. Advertise Here In the legendary competition with Athena to win the patronage of Athens , Poseidon offered to the city the gifts of a saltwater spring and a horse. When angry, he could stir the sea to a fury, but he could also calm the raging waters with just a glance. Pelasgian word, considering an Indo-European etymology "quite pointless". One of his most famous disputes involved the goddess Athena. Poseidon also raped Medusa on the floor of a temple to Athena. Athena, however, planted an olive tree, which was seen as a more useful favor. Both Poseidon and Athena claimed the region of Attica pronounced AT-i-kuh and its capital city as their own. However, in some versions of the story, he, like his brother Zeus, did not share the fate of his other brother and sisters who were eaten by Cronus. But though the Greeks worshipped and respected Poseidon, it is important to note that places of worship to Poseidon were always located outside city walls, indicating that he was too violent and unpredictable for civilized, orderly city life.

The result was the monstrous Minotaur, half-man, half-bull.

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Who Is Poseidon?